Tag Archives: boiling-water canning

Super Citrus Marmalade

citrus bowl

I love the bright, vibrant flavor of fresh citrus; a true spirit lifter when the doldrums of winter creep in.  Wanting to maximize the season, I put up several recipes this year including a double batch of this favorite from last year’s citrus season.  But the end is coming near and this is so bitter-sweet, just like taste of this delicious multifruit marmalade.

4 citrus marm

Super Citrus Marmalade - yields 5 half-pint jars

4 lbs assorted citrus fruit: I selected 2 lemons, 1 pink grapefruit, 2 tangelos, and 3 blood oranges.

6 cups granulated sugar

Wash the fruit in warm, soapy water and pat dry.  Remove the zest from the fruit with a serrated-edge peeler.  Be careful to not remove too much pith or your marm will end up bitter.

skinned citrus

Stack the zest peels and chop into small pieces; in a large pot combine zest and 2 qts of water.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-high, and simmer for 25-30 minutes.

Supreme fruit by cutting away the pith, and then segment to remove from membranes.  Be sure to do this over a large bowl so you can collect the juice.  Remove seeds and set aside.

peeled citrus

Bundle seeds in cheesecloth and securely tie the ends so they cannot escape.  Drain zest in a fine-mesh sieve and reserve the cooking liquid.  Combine zest, segmented citrus and juice, 4 cups of the cooking liquid, sugar, and bundled seeds.  Bring to a hard boil and cook until the mixture reaches 220°F, approximately 35-40 minutes.  Be sure to stir regularly to prevent contents from scorching.

Once the marmalade has reached your desired set, turn off the heat and remove the cheesecloth bundle.  Ladle into hot, sterilized pint jars, wipe rims, and adjust two-piece lids.  Process in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes.

Remove jars from canner and allow to cool on a wire rack, undisturbed, for 12-24 hours so seals may properly set.

Images and content copyright © 2013 Danielle R Limoge. Recipe adapted from Food in Jars by Marisa McClellan.

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Pickled Garlic Scapes

In case you haven’t noticed I’ve been on a garlic scape binge for the past week or so.  I’ve been searching the interwebs high and low, hunting and gathering all recipes featuring their use.  In addition to adding scapes to sautéed veggie medleys I’ve made bean dip, salted herbs, pesto, and now I’ve pickled them!

Dilly Scapesadapted from Ball’s Blue Book of Canning Dilly Bean recipe

6-7 bunches of garlic scapes cut into 4 1/2″ segments (the flower pods and curly sections were reserved for freezing and sauteing)

1/4 cup pickling salt

2-1/2 cups white vinegar

2-1/2 cups water

1 tsp cayenne pepper, divided

6 cloves of garlic, sliced in half and divided (obviously not necessary since scapes are garlic, but I like to snack on pickled garlic too!)

4 tsp dill seed, divided

2 tsp whole peppercorns, divided

Combine salt, vinegar and water in a large pot and bring to a boil.  In hot sterilized pint jars add 3 slices of garlic, 1/2 tsp peppercorns, 1 tsp dill seed and 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper to each jar; pack garlic scapes into jars lengthwise.  Ladle hot liquid over scapes, leaving 1/4” headspace.  Remove air bubbles and adjust two-piece caps to finger-tip tight.  Process pints 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner.  Yields 4 pints.

The brine will take several weeks to develop so I won’t open a jar till mid July, which at that time my beans should be about ready.  If I like the recipe I will use it for dilly beans as well!

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Filed under Boiling-Water Bath Canning, Pickling, Vegetarian

Violet Jelly

You heard me right and no I’m not off my rocker!  I actually made jelly from violets; you know, those little purple flowers, and it’s damn good too!  It’s sweet with a slight tartness.  Turns out you can make jelly from all sorts of things, even dandelions and roses!  My sister-in-law has had rose jelly and she said it’s amazing.  Naturally, I can’t wait to make it!

Right now violets are blooming like crazy.  My property is covered with them!  Originally, I had plans to make this last year, but by the time I remembered it was too late and all the blooms were gone!  This year I was on-the-ball and ended up canning two batches!  Let me tell you how good it felt to be canning again!  Jaime, from Our Little Homestead, is an avid canner as well.  Once she found out I was canning this early in the season boy was she jealous!  I told her I was up to something super secret and she would have to wait to find out.  I’m sure the anticipation is making her nuts, I know it would if it were me!

So without further adieu, I bring to you…

Violet Jelly

2 overflowing cups of fresh violet flowers.  Pick fully open buds for the best flavor and color.

1/4 cup bottled lemon juice

4 cups sugar

1 box pectin

2 cups boiling-water
 

Wash the violets (you do not need to dry them) and place into a non-reactive bowl.  Pour 2 cups boiling-water over the flower petals, cover, and allow to steep up to 24 hours, I left mine in the fridge overnight.  Strain liquid through a cheese cloth, it should be a lovely shade of dark blue.

Next, add lemon juice and watch the infusion morph into a stunning shade of purple. It’s like magic, I tell ya!
Combine sugar with liquid and bring to a boil.  Add pectin and return to a hard boil for one minute.  Remove from heat and ladle into hot, sterile jars, wipe rims and adjust two-piece lids to fingertip-tight.  Process in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes.  Remove jars and allow to cool, undisturbed, for 12-24 hours.

Seriously, have you ever seen a more beautifully jelly?  It didn’t set as thick as most other jams and jellies I’ve made; it has a consistency similar to honey, but then again, so did my grape jelly, which developed a harder set over time.

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Filed under Boiling-Water Bath Canning, Jam & Jelly, Vegan, Vegetarian